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Urban Gardening School
Urban Gardening School

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Even though marigolds repel a lot of insects including carpenter bees, the bumblebees are obsessed with it. Did you know bumblebees are even better pollinators than other bees? They don’t go after the nectar as much as the pollen. So cute and fuzzy. I have actually never seen so many bumblebees in one day before and they are all on the marigolds. The purple dome aster is swarming with honeybees and moths/butterflies. Two years ago there wasn’t even a weed growing in this wasteland of a lot, now there are a hundred plants providing habitat for pollinators, pretty exciting! Very happy about the perennials being completely established so they can keep coming back strong year after year. Next step, beekeeping?
Yarrow is a great pollinator (blooms until winter) and incredibly easy to grow, perhaps a little too easy. A lot of people consider it to be an invasive weed. Want it in your garden without it spreading? I suggest Moonshine Yarrow! As you can see pictured, it has bright yellow flowers and a greenish silver leaf. This variety stays in a nice neat little mound and doesn’t spread like regular yarrow does, which tends to end up like a carpet that stretches over your entire garden. My personal favorite is the pink yarrow, but I don’t plant it in my garden because it tends to shift back into white and it spreads like crazy. If only there was a pink moonshine variety... 
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Harvesting heads of lettuce before they bolt! It was a long winter and a hot May, and the greens are showing it. If you harvest the lettuce after it starts flowering, it becomes milky and tastes very bitter. If you like to save seeds though, you may be happy to see the greens bolting!
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Harvesting heads of lettuce before they bolt! It was a long winter and a hot May, and the greens are showing it. If you harvest the lettuce after it starts flowering, it becomes milky and tastes very bitter. If you like to save seeds though, you may be happy to see the greens bolting! . . . . . . . #organicgardening #organicgardenerschool #lettuce #greens #fromthegarden #homegrown #homegrownfood #homegrownveggies #vegetablegarden #vegetablegardener #gardeningknowhow #garden #gardening #gardener #backyardgarden #homegarden #homegardener #gardenharvest #todaysharvest #harvest #growityourself #growyourown #growyourownfood #growyourownveggies #growwhatyoueat #ediblegarden #veggiepatch #gardenlife #gardenlove #gardenlover

Do you ever wonder why your apple tree doesn’t produce many apples? There are a few things that could be affecting your tree. First of all, make sure you are keeping up on your winter watering. Many people lose trees and shrubs due to not enough moisture over the winter. Just because it’s cold doesn’t mean the ground is frozen. 
A second thing to keep in mind is that some apple varieties produce a heavy load of apples every other year, with much lighter production the years in between. So if you had a light year for apples, there might not be anything wrong at all. It’s just that the tree took so much energy on the last year‘s production that it doesn’t have as much left over the next year. 
Next, apples do better when cross pollinated with another apple, just like with blueberries. So if you are thinking of planting a new apple tree or two, you might want to make sure you get two different varieties. 
Lastly, the most common reason in our experience to not have apples, is because of a false spring/late frost. Many times in the Rocky Mountains, we will get warm weather in February or March long enough to make the fruit trees produce buds. Then come the April and May blizzards that kill off all the fruit. The tree puts so much energy into making those buds that it won’t be able to do it again until next year. If you’d like a gardening challenge, try moving to Colorado. June and September freezes, while July and August are 107° everyday with no rain, just wildfires. Maybe this year there won’t be any apple killing frosts! Good luck everyone. 
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Do you ever wonder why your apple tree doesn’t produce many apples? There are a few things that could be affecting your tree. First of all, make sure you are keeping up on your winter watering. Many people lose trees and shrubs due to not enough moisture over the winter. Just because it’s cold doesn’t mean the ground is frozen. A second thing to keep in mind is that some apple varieties produce a heavy load of apples every other year, with much lighter production the years in between. So if you had a light year for apples, there might not be anything wrong at all. It’s just that the tree took so much energy on the last year‘s production that it doesn’t have as much left over the next year. Next, apples do better when cross pollinated with another apple, just like with blueberries. So if you are thinking of planting a new apple tree or two, you might want to make sure you get two different varieties. Lastly, the most common reason in our experience to not have apples, is because of a false spring/late frost. Many times in the Rocky Mountains, we will get warm weather in February or March long enough to make the fruit trees produce buds. Then come the April and May blizzards that kill off all the fruit. The tree puts so much energy into making those buds that it won’t be able to do it again until next year. If you’d like a gardening challenge, try moving to Colorado. June and September freezes, while July and August are 107° everyday with no rain, just wildfires. Maybe this year there won’t be any apple killing frosts! Good luck everyone. . . . . . #organicgardening #organicgardener #organicgardenerschool #apple #apples #appletrees #appletree #fruittrees #orchard #freshfruit #homegrown #homegrownfood #homegrownfruit #growyourown #growyourownfood #growyourownfruit #fruitfarm #flowers #blossom #appleblossom #floweringtrees #springgarden #springtime #whitetree #naturephotography #scenery #plants #gardenaddict #gardenlife #gardenlove

Most tulips aren’t true perennials, but this Darwin Hybrid Tulip will come back year after year. There are basically 3 types of tulips that are true perennials: Darwin Hybrids, Viridiflora, and Botanical. Most tulips that people buy do not fall into these categories. So if you are wondering why your 4 year old tulip bulbs are only producing foliage and no flowers, that’s why. Tulips have largely been bred to create one single perfect flower, so florists consider them to be annuals. If you’d like to have true perennial tulips, stick to the varieties mentioned above! .
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Most tulips aren’t true perennials, but this Darwin Hybrid Tulip will come back year after year. There are basically 3 types of tulips that are true perennials: Darwin Hybrids, Viridiflora, and Botanical. Most tulips that people buy do not fall into these categories. So if you are wondering why your 4 year old tulip bulbs are only producing foliage and no flowers, that’s why. Tulips have largely been bred to create one single perfect flower, so florists consider them to be annuals. If you’d like to have true perennial tulips, stick to the varieties mentioned above! . . . . . . #organicgardening #flowers #flower #tulip #tulips #perennials #perennialgarden #flowergardening #flowergarden #flowerbed #backyardgarden #homegrown #homegrownflowers #growyourownflowers #flowersofinstagram #floweroftheday #organicgardenerschool #gardentips #gardeningtips #redflowers #bulbs #bulb #flowerbulbs #raisedgardenbeds #raisedbedgarden #garden #gardening #gardener #gardensofinstagram #instagarden

 
Got seedlings?

Got seedlings?

These cotyledons belong to something the bees will appreciate, dandelions! Not just any dandelion, but pink ones! I noticed several people not recommending pink dandelion seeds. They say it only produces greens and no flowers. What these people probably don’t realize is that you probably won’t see any blooms until the second year. That’s not necessarily the case with all dandelions, but the pink ones are especially slow. Looks like we won’t be able to show you what the flowers look like for another year! 
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These cotyledons belong to something the bees will appreciate, dandelions! Not just any dandelion, but pink ones! I noticed several people not recommending pink dandelion seeds. They say it only produces greens and no flowers. What these people probably don’t realize is that you probably won’t see any blooms until the second year. That’s not necessarily the case with all dandelions, but the pink ones are especially slow. Looks like we won’t be able to show you what the flowers look like for another year! . . . . . . #dandelion #dandelions #cotyledon #fromseed #growingfromseed #perennial #perennials #perennialflowers #perennialgarden #permaculture #permaculturegarden #edibleflowers #edibleflower #edibleornamentalgarden #pinkflowers #flowergardening #flowergarden #flowerseeds #organicgardenerschool #babyplants #seedstarting #homegrown #howtogrow #growyourown #savethebees #bees #beefood #pollinators #pollinatorgarden #pollinatorfriendly

Daffodils insure that everyone knows it’s spring, but what if yours aren’t blooming? If you planted bulbs last fall and are seeing foliage with no blooms, they may have not been planted correctly. Besides planting the root side down and the pointy end up, Daffodil bulbs need to be planted 2 to 3 times as deep as they are in length. When they are planted too shallow, they don’t garner enough energy to produce a bloom. Not only that but if they are planted too close to the surface they could dry out or get colder than they want to get. If you are sure the daffodils were planted correctly then you may need to feed them some nutrients, but usually the main cause is planting depth.

Daffodils insure that everyone knows it’s spring, but what if yours aren’t blooming? If you planted bulbs last fall and are seeing foliage with no blooms, they may have not been planted correctly. Besides planting the root side down and the pointy end up, Daffodil bulbs need to be planted 2 to 3 times as deep as they are in length. When they are planted too shallow, they don’t garner enough energy to produce a bloom. Not only that but if they are planted too close to the surface they could dry out or get colder than they want to get. If you are sure the daffodils were planted correctly then you may need to feed them some nutrients, but usually the main cause is planting depth.

Crocus, a symbol of hope. It’s the first flower to bloom in the garden for many people. After a few years, they produce more corms that can then be divided and replanted. Deer will usually leave the crocuses alone unless they are starving, but rabbits and squirrels may be more of an issue. Rabbits and squirrels like to dig up crocus bulbs to munch on. An organic spray like bobbex will deter deer and rabbit, but not the squirrels. If you’re really having a big problem with squirrels a sure way to keep them out is to place a chicken wire dome over your crocus. That’s if you have already emptied your machine gun ;)
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Crocus, a symbol of hope. It’s the first flower to bloom in the garden for many people. After a few years, they produce more corms that can then be divided and replanted. Deer will usually leave the crocuses alone unless they are starving, but rabbits and squirrels may be more of an issue. Rabbits and squirrels like to dig up crocus bulbs to munch on. An organic spray like bobbex will deter deer and rabbit, but not the squirrels. If you’re really having a big problem with squirrels a sure way to keep them out is to place a chicken wire dome over your crocus. That’s if you have already emptied your machine gun ;) . . . . #crocus #crocuses #flower #flowers #springflowers #bulbs #corms #saffron #springgarden #organicgardenerschool #organicgardening #organicgarden #organicgardener #instagarden #gardensofinstagram #gardenersofinstagram #instagardeners #flowergardening #flowergarden #growyourownflowers #instaflowers #flowersofinstagram #homegarden #homegardener #perennials #perennial #whiteflowers #smallflowers #gardening #gardeningtips

 
Tulips! More and more signs of spring by the day! Did you know that not all varieties of tulips bloom at the same time? If you would like to maximize the amount of time there are tulips blooming in your garden, plant as many varieties as you can! You could have tulips for 6 weeks potentially! Of course you’ll have to wait until fall to plant bulbs, but if you are the type to buy plants in the spring it’s something to consider. Just beware of the deer and rabbits, they love the stuff. If you’re having a problem with your tulips getting munched on, you can use an organic deterrent called Bobbex (or something similar). It’s a mixture made up of natural components like herbs and garlic that cute munchers don’t like the taste of, or smell! 
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Tulips! More and more signs of spring by the day! Did you know that not all varieties of tulips bloom at the same time? If you would like to maximize the amount of time there are tulips blooming in your garden, plant as many varieties as you can! You could have tulips for 6 weeks potentially! Of course you’ll have to wait until fall to plant bulbs, but if you are the type to buy plants in the spring it’s something to consider. Just beware of the deer and rabbits, they love the stuff. If you’re having a problem with your tulips getting munched on, you can use an organic deterrent called Bobbex (or something similar). It’s a mixture made up of natural components like herbs and garlic that cute munchers don’t like the taste of, or smell! . . . . . . #tulip #tulips #bulbs #springbulbs #springtulips #folliage #organicgardenerschool #perennials #flower #flowers #growyourownflowers #growyourown #tuliptime #organicgardening #organicflowers #flowercare #growingflowers #growingtulips #springflowers #flowergarden #flowergardening #floralarrangement #florist #flowersofinstagram #instaflowers

Evidence of Spring! If your chives are starting to get crowded, keep reading. Even in zone 5, things are starting to pop up. Chives are hardy down to a zone 3 and actually benefit from the cold season. A pot of chives you bring in for the winter will not have as many blooms as the ones that were left outside. If you’ve had chives for a few years or more, they may be in need of division. Lots of flowering perennials prefer to be divided in the Spring, but not chives. It’s important to wait until late summer/early fall to divide your chives. If you do it in the spring they will likely not flower until the next year. When you do divide your chives, keep them in chunks of about 4 plants per clump. Wait until the chives are done blooming to divide and the following spring, every clump you transplanted will be flowering. You’ll have so many chives you won’t know what to do with all of them, but the bees will love it!

Evidence of Spring! If your chives are starting to get crowded, keep reading. Even in zone 5, things are starting to pop up. Chives are hardy down to a zone 3 and actually benefit from the cold season. A pot of chives you bring in for the winter will not have as many blooms as the ones that were left outside. If you’ve had chives for a few years or more, they may be in need of division. Lots of flowering perennials prefer to be divided in the Spring, but not chives. It’s important to wait until late summer/early fall to divide your chives. If you do it in the spring they will likely not flower until the next year. When you do divide your chives, keep them in chunks of about 4 plants per clump. Wait until the chives are done blooming to divide and the following spring, every clump you transplanted will be flowering. You’ll have so many chives you won’t know what to do with all of them, but the bees will love it!

Although an annual, this German Chamomile made it through the winter and is looking better everyday. Typically chamomile doesn’t survive subzero temperatures, but there are a couple factors here that have kept it alive. For the coldest part of the winter, which is hopefully over, the area was heavily mulched. The chamomile you see here was self-seeded last year, but didn’t get a chance to flower before the fall frost came. Because the flower wants to complete it’s life cycle by reproducing, it fought extra hard to stay alive through the cold so that it can produce seed after it warms up. It will be amazing to have chamomile flowers in early spring, and very exiting to already be seeing so much green in the garden! 
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Although an annual, this German Chamomile made it through the winter and is looking better everyday. Typically chamomile doesn’t survive subzero temperatures, but there are a couple factors here that have kept it alive. For the coldest part of the winter, which is hopefully over, the area was heavily mulched. The chamomile you see here was self-seeded last year, but didn’t get a chance to flower before the fall frost came. Because the flower wants to complete it’s life cycle by reproducing, it fought extra hard to stay alive through the cold so that it can produce seed after it warms up. It will be amazing to have chamomile flowers in early spring, and very exiting to already be seeing so much green in the garden! . . . . . . #chamomile #flowers #medicinal #annuals #selfseeded #organicgardenerschool #garden #gardening #gardener #gardenersofinstagram #gardenlife #gardenerlife #wintergarden #wintergardening #organicgardening #nongmo #naturalgarden #coldhardy #gardentime #gardentips #germanchamomile #landscaping #plant #plants #planting #gardendesign #herbgarden #teagarden #herbaltea #medicinegarden

One of the first signs of spring is the Clematis leafing out. Although it may be tempting to pull off all of the dead, you need to be very slow and careful. Clematis vines, before they start leafing out, appear as they are dead. Not only are they the same color as the dead foliage, but they are extremely brittle and will snap right in half. The best way to trim back the dead on a clematis is to start from the very tips of the ends and work your way in. By starting from the ends, there is much less risk of cutting off living branches. If you accidentally remove something you thought was dead, there will be hardly any loss to the plant by not starting at the base or middle. A general rule for testing if a plant or stem is alive is to take your clippers or a knife and peel back some of the outer layer. If that reveals anything green the plant is still alive. If you peel back the outer layer and all you can see is dried up brown on the inside, the plant or stem is no longer viable. With Clematis, it is sometimes safer to let more green fill in before removing the dead, but waiting too long will make it difficult to reach. Either way, we are just happy to see the first signs of Spring!

One of the first signs of spring is the Clematis leafing out. Although it may be tempting to pull off all of the dead, you need to be very slow and careful. Clematis vines, before they start leafing out, appear as they are dead. Not only are they the same color as the dead foliage, but they are extremely brittle and will snap right in half. The best way to trim back the dead on a clematis is to start from the very tips of the ends and work your way in. By starting from the ends, there is much less risk of cutting off living branches. If you accidentally remove something you thought was dead, there will be hardly any loss to the plant by not starting at the base or middle. A general rule for testing if a plant or stem is alive is to take your clippers or a knife and peel back some of the outer layer. If that reveals anything green the plant is still alive. If you peel back the outer layer and all you can see is dried up brown on the inside, the plant or stem is no longer viable. With Clematis, it is sometimes safer to let more green fill in before removing the dead, but waiting too long will make it difficult to reach. Either way, we are just happy to see the first signs of Spring!

 
Growing peppers this year? Seedlings should be around 7 or 8 weeks old before getting transplanted outside. Since a lot of seed starting cells are very small, you can’t leave the plants growing in them the entire time they’re inside for the 7-8 weeks. There’s just not enough soil in a small cell to support the root system. Since February/March is still way too cold to plant peppers outside in most zones, you’ll need to transfer them into solo cup sized pots for the remainder of their time indoors. Transplanting into too big of pot will take up too much precious space under your grow light or greenhouse and waste potting soil. Make sure you don’t transplant too early. Baby seedling roots can be very delicate, so wait until there are 2+ true leaves before removing peppers from their original seed starting cells. The peppers you see in this post are ready to be transplanted into larger pots now. They will stay in their new pots until May. If you’re thinking 3 months is a long time to keep seedlings inside, consider the gardening zone. In this part of the  Colorado Rocky Mountains it’s a zone 5, which means we still get snow or freezes in late spring/early summer. The problem with simply waiting an extra month or two to start pepper seeds is the high number of days to harvest. Hot peppers can take 150+ days until you can pick fruit. If you wait too long to start your hot pepper seedlings in a zone 5, your plants will succumb to the first fall frost before you ever get to pick a pepper. So if you’re in a colder zone and want to grow hot peppers, it’s a good idea to invest in a grow light. Happy seed starting everyone! Let the growing season begin!

Growing peppers this year? Seedlings should be around 7 or 8 weeks old before getting transplanted outside. Since a lot of seed starting cells are very small, you can’t leave the plants growing in them the entire time they’re inside for the 7-8 weeks. There’s just not enough soil in a small cell to support the root system. Since February/March is still way too cold to plant peppers outside in most zones, you’ll need to transfer them into solo cup sized pots for the remainder of their time indoors. Transplanting into too big of pot will take up too much precious space under your grow light or greenhouse and waste potting soil. Make sure you don’t transplant too early. Baby seedling roots can be very delicate, so wait until there are 2+ true leaves before removing peppers from their original seed starting cells. The peppers you see in this post are ready to be transplanted into larger pots now. They will stay in their new pots until May. If you’re thinking 3 months is a long time to keep seedlings inside, consider the gardening zone. In this part of the Colorado Rocky Mountains it’s a zone 5, which means we still get snow or freezes in late spring/early summer. The problem with simply waiting an extra month or two to start pepper seeds is the high number of days to harvest. Hot peppers can take 150+ days until you can pick fruit. If you wait too long to start your hot pepper seedlings in a zone 5, your plants will succumb to the first fall frost before you ever get to pick a pepper. So if you’re in a colder zone and want to grow hot peppers, it’s a good idea to invest in a grow light. Happy seed starting everyone! Let the growing season begin!

The bougainvilleas are definitely not surviving this time around... When it’s below 40°F (4°C) the leaves will wilt, but if it’s stays below 32°F (0°C) for too long the plant will die. How quick it dies depends on how far below freezing it gets and for how long the temperature stays there. At 9°F (-13°C), this one ain’t makin’ it. 
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The bougainvilleas are definitely not surviving this time around... When it’s below 40°F (4°C) the leaves will wilt, but if it’s stays below 32°F (0°C) for too long the plant will die. How quick it dies depends on how far below freezing it gets and for how long the temperature stays there. At 9°F (-13°C), this one ain’t makin’ it. . . . . . #bougainvillea #wintergarden #wintergardening #icicles #frozenleaves #organicgardenerschool #urbangardening #urbangarden #urbangardener #gardensofinstagram #gardenersofinstagram #instagarden #instagardener #instagardeners #offseason #gardenhelp #gardeningtips #gardentips #gardentipsandtricks #gardeningadvice #containergardening #decorativeplants #patiogarden #patiogardening #pottedplants #backyardgarden #backyardgardening #gardenmistakes #gardening #gardener

Rabbit Brush, Ericameria nauseosa, is native to the arid western areas of North America. Its big bright yellow blooms show up in late summer/fall, providing a lot of pollen for bees. Native Americans used it for yellow dye, medicinal tea, and chewing gum. The Navajo traditionally mashed the leaves into a lotion to treat headaches. Might be worth trying out? Back during WWII it was used as a source for rubber, and some folks are looking into starting that type of production again. It’s really easy to grow from seed! It’s a perennial but doesn’t need cold stratification for the seeds to germinate. It prefers full-sun and infertile soil. This extremely drought tolerant plant works great in a xeriscape garden

Rabbit Brush, Ericameria nauseosa, is native to the arid western areas of North America. Its big bright yellow blooms show up in late summer/fall, providing a lot of pollen for bees. Native Americans used it for yellow dye, medicinal tea, and chewing gum. The Navajo traditionally mashed the leaves into a lotion to treat headaches. Might be worth trying out? Back during WWII it was used as a source for rubber, and some folks are looking into starting that type of production again. It’s really easy to grow from seed! It’s a perennial but doesn’t need cold stratification for the seeds to germinate. It prefers full-sun and infertile soil. This extremely drought tolerant plant works great in a xeriscape garden #nativeplants

This strawberry plant was dug up from the ground in early December, and transplanted into a pot. It now has several new leaves and a flower! By the time it’s warm enough to plant outside it will already be producing strawberries, and will continue to do so for years to come! .
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This strawberry plant was dug up from the ground in early December, and transplanted into a pot. It now has several new leaves and a flower! By the time it’s warm enough to plant outside it will already be producing strawberries, and will continue to do so for years to come! . . . . . . #organicgardening #Strawberries #homegrownstrawberries #homegrownfruit #homegrownfood #growyourownfood #growyourown #growyourownfruit #permaculture #perennials #perennialgarden #perennial #foodforest #foragedfood #foraging #easytogrow #organicgardenerschool #garden #horticulture #gardening #gardener #mastergardener #fromthegarden #planttherapy #blooming #farmtofork #farmtoplate #flower #flowers #flowering

 
2020 Highlights! It was a big year for gardening, seed stores across the world were out of stock! It’s more important now than ever to learn the art of seed saving for ourselves and others. Now that the grocery store shortages seem to be over, let’s hope all the new gardeners of 2020 will become second year gardeners for 2021! I hope you enjoy these

#2020 Highlights! It was a big year for gardening, seed stores across the world were out of stock! It’s more important now than ever to learn the art of seed saving for ourselves and others. Now that the grocery store shortages seem to be over, let’s hope all the new gardeners of 2020 will become second year gardeners for 2021! I hope you enjoy these #top9of2020 as much as we did. Can’t wait to see what next year brings! . . . . #gardening #gardeningtips #freshflowers #homegrownflowers #growyourown #growyourownfood #growyourownflowers #growyourownveggies #healthyeating #organicgardenerschool #organicgardening #organicgarden #organicgardener #organicfarming #gardentotable #farmtotable #fromthegarden #mygarden #garden #gardening #gardener #gardenersofinstagram #instagardeners #nye2020 #newyear #newyearnewgoals #greenthumb #organicproduce #homegardening

Did you know that you can use aloe vera as a rooting hormone? Not only is it anti-fungal, antibacterial, and antiviral, but it gives nutrients needed to help your propagation root out. If you stick the bottom of your cutting into a chunk of aloe vera, or dip it into a gel and water mixture, you will increase your chance of success when it comes to making clones of your favorite plants. So get your propagation station ready if you’re looking for a wintertime plant project!

Did you know that you can use aloe vera as a rooting hormone? Not only is it anti-fungal, antibacterial, and antiviral, but it gives nutrients needed to help your propagation root out. If you stick the bottom of your cutting into a chunk of aloe vera, or dip it into a gel and water mixture, you will increase your chance of success when it comes to making clones of your favorite plants. So get your propagation station ready if you’re looking for a wintertime plant project!

Do you know why oregano is ancient Greek for “joy of the mountain”? Because it was believed that cows that grazed in fields where oregano grew had much tastier meat. Makes sense!
Oregano is a perennial herb that’s hardy down to a zone 5. It’s foliage dies off in the cold but the roots stay alive so that it grows back in the spring. It produces small purple flowers (much like mint, because it’s part of the mint family) that the bees enjoy. 
To save dried oregano, hang the stems upside down in dry and dark place. If you put a paper bag around your oregano it will prevent dust from collecting and a mess from forming underneath. Drying takes about 2 weeks. 
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Do you know why oregano is ancient Greek for “joy of the mountain”? Because it was believed that cows that grazed in fields where oregano grew had much tastier meat. Makes sense! Oregano is a perennial herb that’s hardy down to a zone 5. It’s foliage dies off in the cold but the roots stay alive so that it grows back in the spring. It produces small purple flowers (much like mint, because it’s part of the mint family) that the bees enjoy. To save dried oregano, hang the stems upside down in dry and dark place. If you put a paper bag around your oregano it will prevent dust from collecting and a mess from forming underneath. Drying takes about 2 weeks. . . . . #oregano #dryingherbs #spices #homegrown #homegrownherbs #growyourownherbs #culinary #culinaryherbs #mediteranean #greek #ancientgreece #delicious #planttips #howtogarden #mygarden #organicgardenerschool #wintergarden #fallgarden #growingherbs #herbgarden #herbgardening #mint #floweringplant #floweringplants #gardensofinstagram #instagarden #instaherbal #folliage #cooking #homechef

English Lavender, a woody perennial, is hardy down to a zone 5. This baby was started from seed at the beginning of 2020, now it’s been transplanted into the ground. You can see it’s cool weather color change, which will look even better next year when it has grown. It can be challenging to start lavender from seed, and slow growing after it has been started, but once established it’s very easy to keep alive. It’s very drought tolerant and likes well draining (even sandy or pebbles) soil. The most common way to kill lavender is by over-watering, it doesn’t like to have wet feet. Be careful not to overdo the winter watering (if there is no rain or snow) because the shorter/cooler days will not be drying the plants out very quickly. 
It’s important to cut your lavender back every year so that it keeps its foliage from head to toe. If you go too long without trimming, it becomes very woody and the stems become too thick to be able to put out new foliage. Cutting back your lavender every year (we cut off about 2/3 of the plant) will ensure full purple blooms and aromatic foliage covering the entire plant. If you cut your lavender back after it is done blooming, you can get a second round of flowering in the same season. Not only will lavender roots survive subzero temperatures, but the foliage can stay alive for a lot of the winter too!

English Lavender, a woody perennial, is hardy down to a zone 5. This baby was started from seed at the beginning of 2020, now it’s been transplanted into the ground. You can see it’s cool weather color change, which will look even better next year when it has grown. It can be challenging to start lavender from seed, and slow growing after it has been started, but once established it’s very easy to keep alive. It’s very drought tolerant and likes well draining (even sandy or pebbles) soil. The most common way to kill lavender is by over-watering, it doesn’t like to have wet feet. Be careful not to overdo the winter watering (if there is no rain or snow) because the shorter/cooler days will not be drying the plants out very quickly. It’s important to cut your lavender back every year so that it keeps its foliage from head to toe. If you go too long without trimming, it becomes very woody and the stems become too thick to be able to put out new foliage. Cutting back your lavender every year (we cut off about 2/3 of the plant) will ensure full purple blooms and aromatic foliage covering the entire plant. If you cut your lavender back after it is done blooming, you can get a second round of flowering in the same season. Not only will lavender roots survive subzero temperatures, but the foliage can stay alive for a lot of the winter too!

 
Starting self-harvested seeds next season? It’s a good idea to do a germination test before it’s actually time to sow. If the seeds, for whatever reason, end up not being viable and you don’t find out until it’s time to plant you could have problems. By the time it’s time to start planting, many companies are sold out of certain seeds already. So if your seeds don’t work you may not be able to get more in time. Now with covid, people are doing more at home activities and realizing the need to grow their own food. Seed companies are selling out faster than ever, making harvesting seeds ourselves even more important. Not only does harvesting your own seed save you money, but those seeds are acclimated to your specific climate. The seeds you buy from online or in the store almost never come from your local area and don’t have genetics as adapted for your conditions. It never hurts to ask a neighbor for some seeds if they have a plant you like! 
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Starting self-harvested seeds next season? It’s a good idea to do a germination test before it’s actually time to sow. If the seeds, for whatever reason, end up not being viable and you don’t find out until it’s time to plant you could have problems. By the time it’s time to start planting, many companies are sold out of certain seeds already. So if your seeds don’t work you may not be able to get more in time. Now with covid, people are doing more at home activities and realizing the need to grow their own food. Seed companies are selling out faster than ever, making harvesting seeds ourselves even more important. Not only does harvesting your own seed save you money, but those seeds are acclimated to your specific climate. The seeds you buy from online or in the store almost never come from your local area and don’t have genetics as adapted for your conditions. It never hurts to ask a neighbor for some seeds if they have a plant you like! . . . . #seeds #seed #seedstarting #startingseeds #startingseedsindoors #germination #indoorgardening #indoorgarden #seedstarts #organicgardenerschool #fromseed #earlybirdgetstheworm #sustainable #sustainability #growyourownveggies #seeding #nogmoseeds #nongmogardening #organicgardening #organicseeds #selfharvest #soil #seedtester #seeded #seedling #seedlings #babyplant #babyplants #plantbabies #peppers

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