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Where News Inspires Change

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Glaciers near Greenland's capital Nuuk are melting as human-caused climate change continues to warm the planet. Photos: Reuters

Glaciers near Greenland's capital Nuuk are melting as human-caused climate change continues to warm the planet. Photos: Reuters

A Harvard geneticist has co-founded a new company with the audacious goal to engineer a hybrid between an elephant and the extinct woolly mammoth.

A Harvard geneticist has co-founded a new company with the audacious goal to engineer a hybrid between an elephant and the extinct woolly mammoth.

A group of boys playing soccer in Nabarangapur district in Odisha state kicked the ball out of the field, causing two bears to inspect and bounce the ball between them.

The mother bear and cub were recorded kicking and tossing the ball in the air.

A group of boys playing soccer in Nabarangapur district in Odisha state kicked the ball out of the field, causing two bears to inspect and bounce the ball between them. The mother bear and cub were recorded kicking and tossing the ball in the air.

 
According to Palestinian officials, almost 1,400 Palestinians held in Israeli prisons are set to go on hunger strike in protest of the conditions of their detention.

According to Palestinian officials, almost 1,400 Palestinians held in Israeli prisons are set to go on hunger strike in protest of the conditions of their detention.

This week, French President Emmanuel Macron will announce plans to boost oversight of the police, according to a presidential source. It follows protests against police immunity and repeated allegations of violence, brutality and racism in the force.

Macron is expected to unveil a wide-ranging reform package as a result of months of discussions on how to improve relations between the police force and communities, while also enhancing the working conditions of the officers.

The presidential source said that Macron's proposals would include creating a mechanism that enables "independent oversight" of the police which is “external” to the National Police. 

Currently The Inspection Generale de la Police Nationale (IGPN) is assigned to look after these duties, which is again composed of mostly police officers and its head is appointed by the interior minister, who is in charge of the police.

The consultations were triggered after a video went viral last November showing four white officers beating up an unarmed black music producer in his Paris studio.

The attack on music producer Michel Zecler caused widespread outrage and sparked a backlash from French Black Lives Matter activists about police brutality against minorities, particularly black and Arab men.

While Macron denied a problem of institutional racism in the police force, he admitted to the problem of racial profiling.

"When you have a skin colour that is not white, you are stopped much more [by police]. You are identified as a problem factor," Macron said in an interview to Brut video news portal in December.

Meanwhile, French police complain that they are overworked and are also subject to attacks from violent demonstrators and crime gangs.

Therefore, Macron is also expected to announce plans to "invest massively" in the police in return for "radical changes" in how they protect citizens. Photo:  Ludovic Marin / Reuters

This week, French President Emmanuel Macron will announce plans to boost oversight of the police, according to a presidential source. It follows protests against police immunity and repeated allegations of violence, brutality and racism in the force. Macron is expected to unveil a wide-ranging reform package as a result of months of discussions on how to improve relations between the police force and communities, while also enhancing the working conditions of the officers. The presidential source said that Macron's proposals would include creating a mechanism that enables "independent oversight" of the police which is “external” to the National Police. Currently The Inspection Generale de la Police Nationale (IGPN) is assigned to look after these duties, which is again composed of mostly police officers and its head is appointed by the interior minister, who is in charge of the police. The consultations were triggered after a video went viral last November showing four white officers beating up an unarmed black music producer in his Paris studio. The attack on music producer Michel Zecler caused widespread outrage and sparked a backlash from French Black Lives Matter activists about police brutality against minorities, particularly black and Arab men. While Macron denied a problem of institutional racism in the police force, he admitted to the problem of racial profiling. "When you have a skin colour that is not white, you are stopped much more [by police]. You are identified as a problem factor," Macron said in an interview to Brut video news portal in December. Meanwhile, French police complain that they are overworked and are also subject to attacks from violent demonstrators and crime gangs. Therefore, Macron is also expected to announce plans to "invest massively" in the police in return for "radical changes" in how they protect citizens. Photo: Ludovic Marin / Reuters

A 120-kph (75 mph) wind causes a Citgo gas station roof to lose balance and collapse in northeast Texas.

Nicholas, the storm that turned into a hurricane, is the second in recent weeks to threaten the US Gulf Coast.

A 120-kph (75 mph) wind causes a Citgo gas station roof to lose balance and collapse in northeast Texas. Nicholas, the storm that turned into a hurricane, is the second in recent weeks to threaten the US Gulf Coast.

As the Istanbul fire brigade celebrates its 307th anniversary, it also commemorates another milestone; this year marks the first time female firefighters have graduated alongside their male peers.

Having completed intensive psychological and physical training, the 37 female firefighters from around the country cannot wait to serve the public.

“I have always felt an attraction to the vocation,” 25-year-old Leyla Kaya tells TRT World. 
When asked if she feels out of place in the male-dominated field, Nurdan Nalcakar, 25, says the opposite is true: “It’s totally based on teamwork. What my male colleague can’t do, I will do. What I can’t do, my male colleague will do. It’s a job for a team. No one works alone, I can say that much.”

Nuran Degirmenci, 24, states that women can do any job they put their mind to. “We proved them wrong as ‘the girls,’” she says. “I cannot thank my friends enough, we fought together, with perseverance, with determination, which allowed us to become good firefighters in every sense of the word,” she adds, excited to have broken through the glass ceiling. 

“I believe women can achieve anything. They can be doctors, nurses, engineers, and now firefighters, too,” adds 27-year-old graduate Emine Terzi. Photo: Melis Alemdar/TRT World

Click the link in our bio for more.

As the Istanbul fire brigade celebrates its 307th anniversary, it also commemorates another milestone; this year marks the first time female firefighters have graduated alongside their male peers. Having completed intensive psychological and physical training, the 37 female firefighters from around the country cannot wait to serve the public. “I have always felt an attraction to the vocation,” 25-year-old Leyla Kaya tells TRT World. When asked if she feels out of place in the male-dominated field, Nurdan Nalcakar, 25, says the opposite is true: “It’s totally based on teamwork. What my male colleague can’t do, I will do. What I can’t do, my male colleague will do. It’s a job for a team. No one works alone, I can say that much.” Nuran Degirmenci, 24, states that women can do any job they put their mind to. “We proved them wrong as ‘the girls,’” she says. “I cannot thank my friends enough, we fought together, with perseverance, with determination, which allowed us to become good firefighters in every sense of the word,” she adds, excited to have broken through the glass ceiling. “I believe women can achieve anything. They can be doctors, nurses, engineers, and now firefighters, too,” adds 27-year-old graduate Emine Terzi. Photo: Melis Alemdar/TRT World Click the link in our bio for more.

 
Palestinian children exposed to tear gas escaped in fear and panic as Israeli forces fired near a school in Hebron, occupied West Bank.

Palestinian children exposed to tear gas escaped in fear and panic as Israeli forces fired near a school in Hebron, occupied West Bank.

Afghan women around the world have launched an online campaign and are sharing photographs of themselves in their traditional colourful attire to protest the Taliban's new dress code for women.

Afghan women around the world have launched an online campaign and are sharing photographs of themselves in their traditional colourful attire to protest the Taliban's new dress code for women. #AfghanistanCulture #afghantraditions #afghanculture

Prominent fashion house Balenciaga’s $1,190 sweatpants are being condemned on social media for mimicking Black hip hop culture’s sagging trouser style, commonly worn by Black American males. 

“This feels racist. This feels very racist, guys” TikTok user @mr200m__ – whose real name is Josiah Hyacinth – says in a video that has garnered over a million views and over 3,300 comments. 

Hyacinth is seen inspecting Balenciaga’s trousers at a department store saying: “They have woven these boxers inside the trousers. You know when something feels racist.  @Balenciaga I have questions.”

Another user @6aptiste comment remarks: “They’ve gentrified sagging.” 

Black history experts have also criticised Balenciaga for “cultural appropriation”. Associate professor and author Marquita Gammage, told CNN that she sees Balenciaga men’s “Trompe-L'Oeil'' sweatpants as its exploitation of "Black culture with the hopes of securing major profits".

Gammage further explains that the sagging pants style was “used to criminalise Blacks, especially Black males as thugs and a threat to American society," referring to certain laws that targeted Black people for wearing sagging trousers below the belt in several US states. 

Balenciaga’s chief marketing officer, Ludivine Pont, responded to CNN with a statement contesting that the trousers are an extension of the company’s “vision”. 

“In many of our collections, we combine different wardrobe pieces into a single garment, such as denim jeans layered over tracksuit pants, cargo shorts merged with jeans and button-up shirts layered over t-shirts.”

What do you think?

Photo:  Balenciaga

Prominent fashion house Balenciaga’s $1,190 sweatpants are being condemned on social media for mimicking Black hip hop culture’s sagging trouser style, commonly worn by Black American males. “This feels racist. This feels very racist, guys” TikTok user @mr200m__ – whose real name is Josiah Hyacinth – says in a video that has garnered over a million views and over 3,300 comments. Hyacinth is seen inspecting Balenciaga’s trousers at a department store saying: “They have woven these boxers inside the trousers. You know when something feels racist. @Balenciaga I have questions.” Another user @6aptiste comment remarks: “They’ve gentrified sagging.” Black history experts have also criticised Balenciaga for “cultural appropriation”. Associate professor and author Marquita Gammage, told CNN that she sees Balenciaga men’s “Trompe-L'Oeil'' sweatpants as its exploitation of "Black culture with the hopes of securing major profits". Gammage further explains that the sagging pants style was “used to criminalise Blacks, especially Black males as thugs and a threat to American society," referring to certain laws that targeted Black people for wearing sagging trousers below the belt in several US states. Balenciaga’s chief marketing officer, Ludivine Pont, responded to CNN with a statement contesting that the trousers are an extension of the company’s “vision”. “In many of our collections, we combine different wardrobe pieces into a single garment, such as denim jeans layered over tracksuit pants, cargo shorts merged with jeans and button-up shirts layered over t-shirts.” What do you think? Photo: Balenciaga

This taxi lot located in Bangkok makes for an unusual sight. 

Taxis, abandoned due to a decline in jobs during the coronavirus pandemic, are now being used as a community garden by the employees of the taxi company. 

Vegetables and plants grow on the roof of the vehicles as a source of food for employees and as a way to relax and destress. 

Gig workers, such as taxi drivers, are among the hardest hit by the loss of work during the pandemic. Photos: Andre Malerba/AA

This taxi lot located in Bangkok makes for an unusual sight. Taxis, abandoned due to a decline in jobs during the coronavirus pandemic, are now being used as a community garden by the employees of the taxi company. Vegetables and plants grow on the roof of the vehicles as a source of food for employees and as a way to relax and destress. Gig workers, such as taxi drivers, are among the hardest hit by the loss of work during the pandemic. Photos: Andre Malerba/AA

 
A man kicked a 32-year-old woman in the chest in Brooklyn, US, sending her flying down a subway escalator after she told him to “say excuse me” for pushing his way past her. 

Police are looking for the attacker who caused the victim cuts and bruises.

A man kicked a 32-year-old woman in the chest in Brooklyn, US, sending her flying down a subway escalator after she told him to “say excuse me” for pushing his way past her.  Police are looking for the attacker who caused the victim cuts and bruises.

Israel's Naftali Bennett has met Egypt's Abdel Fattah el Sisi, on the first visit to the North African country by a prime minister of the Jewish state in over a decade.

Sisi hosted Bennett in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh where they discussed "efforts to revive the peace process" between the Israelis and Palestinians, presidential spokesman Bassam Radi said.

Security cooperation between the two countries was also discussed at the meeting attended by Egyptian intelligence chief Abbas Kamel and Israel's National Security Advisor Eyal Holata, Radi said.

The last meeting between an Egyptian president and an Israeli premier dates back to January 2011 when Hosni Mubarak received Netanyahu, weeks before Mubarak was toppled in a popular revolution. Photo: Egyptian Presidency/Handout via AFP 

Click the link in our bio for more. 
•⁣

Israel's Naftali Bennett has met Egypt's Abdel Fattah el Sisi, on the first visit to the North African country by a prime minister of the Jewish state in over a decade. Sisi hosted Bennett in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh where they discussed "efforts to revive the peace process" between the Israelis and Palestinians, presidential spokesman Bassam Radi said. Security cooperation between the two countries was also discussed at the meeting attended by Egyptian intelligence chief Abbas Kamel and Israel's National Security Advisor Eyal Holata, Radi said. The last meeting between an Egyptian president and an Israeli premier dates back to January 2011 when Hosni Mubarak received Netanyahu, weeks before Mubarak was toppled in a popular revolution. Photo: Egyptian Presidency/Handout via AFP Click the link in our bio for more. •⁣ #egypt #Israel #palestine

Indian rescue crew used life jackets, ropes and makeshift bridges to save people in western Gujarat state after heavy rains caused severe flooding

Indian rescue crew used life jackets, ropes and makeshift bridges to save people in western Gujarat state after heavy rains caused severe flooding

When September comes, Thrace looks forward to the Pavli Fair, the oldest fair in the region, dating back to the Ottoman Empire.

The annual event takes place every September, as it has done since 1910, when it began with the order of Sultan Abdulhamid II. It is the oldest and biggest fair that takes place in Turkey.

After a brief hiatus due to Covid-19, the 111th Pavli Fair resumed its four-day festivities this September. Around 10,000 people gathered in Turkey’s Kirklareli district to celebrate their culture, history, and to reinforce unity among the people of Thrace.

More than 400 tradesmen take part every year to sell traditional clothes and ornaments. Visitors get the chance to purchase foodstuffs straight from the fields. Guests can also dance, play sports, and enjoy rides at the amusement park. 

The fair’s site is decorated with traditional Turkish rugs, pillows, and blankets, and villagers adorn the vehicles they arrive in with arched branches and tarpaulins.

The event is highly anticipated by young and old alike, as well as locals and tourists. Photos: Ozgun Tiran / AA

Swipe to see this year’s festivities.

When September comes, Thrace looks forward to the Pavli Fair, the oldest fair in the region, dating back to the Ottoman Empire. The annual event takes place every September, as it has done since 1910, when it began with the order of Sultan Abdulhamid II. It is the oldest and biggest fair that takes place in Turkey. After a brief hiatus due to Covid-19, the 111th Pavli Fair resumed its four-day festivities this September. Around 10,000 people gathered in Turkey’s Kirklareli district to celebrate their culture, history, and to reinforce unity among the people of Thrace. More than 400 tradesmen take part every year to sell traditional clothes and ornaments. Visitors get the chance to purchase foodstuffs straight from the fields. Guests can also dance, play sports, and enjoy rides at the amusement park. The fair’s site is decorated with traditional Turkish rugs, pillows, and blankets, and villagers adorn the vehicles they arrive in with arched branches and tarpaulins. The event is highly anticipated by young and old alike, as well as locals and tourists. Photos: Ozgun Tiran / AA Swipe to see this year’s festivities.

 
Afghanistan is teetering on the brink of “universal poverty”, which could become a reality in the middle of next year unless urgent efforts are made to bolster local communities and their economies, the United Nations Development Program warned.

According to the development agency’s report, the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan has put 20 years of steady economic gains at risk of being reversed.

The country’s GDP is projected to decline between 3.6 percent and 13.2 percent in the next fiscal year starting in June 2022, depending on the intensity of the crisis and how much the world engages with the Taliban.

That is in sharp contrast to the expected 4 percent growth in GDP before the Taliban assumed power for a second time on August 15.

“Afghanistan pretty much faces universal poverty by the middle of next year,” UNDP’s Asia-Pacific director Kanni Wignaraja said, adding that Afghanistan now faces “a humanitarian and development disaster”.

“That’s where we’re heading, it’s 97-98 percent [poverty rate] no matter how you work these projections,” she added. 

Currently, Afghanistan's poverty rate is 72 percent.

Even before the Taliban's seizure of Kabul last month, half the population — or 18 million people — was dependent on aid.

That figure looks set to increase due to drought and shortages of cash and food, UN officials and aid groups warn. 

The UN, along with its partners, is seeking $606 million to help 11 million people in Afghanistan until the end of the year. Photo: Felipe Dana/AP

Afghanistan is teetering on the brink of “universal poverty”, which could become a reality in the middle of next year unless urgent efforts are made to bolster local communities and their economies, the United Nations Development Program warned. According to the development agency’s report, the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan has put 20 years of steady economic gains at risk of being reversed. The country’s GDP is projected to decline between 3.6 percent and 13.2 percent in the next fiscal year starting in June 2022, depending on the intensity of the crisis and how much the world engages with the Taliban. That is in sharp contrast to the expected 4 percent growth in GDP before the Taliban assumed power for a second time on August 15. “Afghanistan pretty much faces universal poverty by the middle of next year,” UNDP’s Asia-Pacific director Kanni Wignaraja said, adding that Afghanistan now faces “a humanitarian and development disaster”. “That’s where we’re heading, it’s 97-98 percent [poverty rate] no matter how you work these projections,” she added. Currently, Afghanistan's poverty rate is 72 percent. Even before the Taliban's seizure of Kabul last month, half the population — or 18 million people — was dependent on aid. That figure looks set to increase due to drought and shortages of cash and food, UN officials and aid groups warn. The UN, along with its partners, is seeking $606 million to help 11 million people in Afghanistan until the end of the year. Photo: Felipe Dana/AP

A recent surge in Covid-19 cases among unvaccinated Americans is overwhelming US hospitals. Many of them are turning away patients due to a shortage of beds in intensive care units.

A recent surge in Covid-19 cases among unvaccinated Americans is overwhelming US hospitals. Many of them are turning away patients due to a shortage of beds in intensive care units.

Initially set up by its founders in 2019 to reflect their love of music, the last shop in Britain dedicated to selling cassettes is now tapping into a nostalgic trend in cultural consumption accentuated by the coronavirus pandemic. 

Mars Tapes crams around 1,000 cassettes, a Coca-Cola radio, boom boxes, vintage editions of the Walkman cassette player and other tape-related accessories into its compact Manchester store. 

The store acquires stock from websites like eBay, individual donations and record labels, while also supporting local indie bands by purchasing their tapes.

Modern artists such as Lady Gaga, Dua Lipa and Selena Gomez have released tapes recently, pushing cassette sales in Britain up to around 157,000 in 2020, the highest figure since 2003.

But the boom in cassette consumption is not confined to an older generation seeking to relive their youth. 

Younger listeners also increasingly prefer to savour music rather than mindlessly skipping through online playlists and endlessly scrolling through social media.

“It’s tangible, something you physically own, not just downloaded data,” says customer Mark Williams.

Socially conscious listeners also want independent artists to earn a good living from their work instead of filling the coffers of streaming giants like Spotify and Apple Music.

“You own the music and support the artist, big and small,” explains co-founder Giorgio Carbone. 

Mass production of cassettes began in the 1960s, with 2.4 million tape players produced and sold worldwide by 86 different manufacturers by 1968. Photo: Paul Ellis/AFP
•

Initially set up by its founders in 2019 to reflect their love of music, the last shop in Britain dedicated to selling cassettes is now tapping into a nostalgic trend in cultural consumption accentuated by the coronavirus pandemic. Mars Tapes crams around 1,000 cassettes, a Coca-Cola radio, boom boxes, vintage editions of the Walkman cassette player and other tape-related accessories into its compact Manchester store. The store acquires stock from websites like eBay, individual donations and record labels, while also supporting local indie bands by purchasing their tapes. Modern artists such as Lady Gaga, Dua Lipa and Selena Gomez have released tapes recently, pushing cassette sales in Britain up to around 157,000 in 2020, the highest figure since 2003. But the boom in cassette consumption is not confined to an older generation seeking to relive their youth. Younger listeners also increasingly prefer to savour music rather than mindlessly skipping through online playlists and endlessly scrolling through social media. “It’s tangible, something you physically own, not just downloaded data,” says customer Mark Williams. Socially conscious listeners also want independent artists to earn a good living from their work instead of filling the coffers of streaming giants like Spotify and Apple Music. “You own the music and support the artist, big and small,” explains co-founder Giorgio Carbone. Mass production of cassettes began in the 1960s, with 2.4 million tape players produced and sold worldwide by 86 different manufacturers by 1968. Photo: Paul Ellis/AFP • #cassettes #Music #nostalgic #MarsTapes #manchester

Lethal attacks on land and environmental defenders continue to rise for another year.

Lethal attacks on land and environmental defenders continue to rise for another year.

 
US forces had trained a Guinean special forces unit that later staged a coup, replacing the president with Colonel Mamady Doumbouya, who has ties to America and France.

US forces had trained a Guinean special forces unit that later staged a coup, replacing the president with Colonel Mamady Doumbouya, who has ties to America and France.

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